Our interdisciplinary courses, offered in different locations in the Americas, combine the face-to-face quality of traditional classrooms with immersive site visits and online collaboration. Whether through semester-length seminars or thematically-based summer intensives, Hemi courses work to expand conventional understandings of about the production and transmission of knowledge. Collaborative pedagogies, interdisciplinary research methodologies, an emphasis on situated and site-specific knowledge, field work, and physical practice comprise some of the strategies through which we are redefining pedagogy and knowledge production. While course materials are accessible only to registered students, course information is available below.

sp11_theories_spectatorship

This course explores the politics of cultural memory in the aftermath of the atrocities of the 20th and 21st centuries. Theories of memory, trauma, performance and activism emerging from work on the Holocaust, the dictatorships and neo-liberal violence in Latin America and the post 9/11 US will inform our analysis of photography, multi-media art works, testimony projects and performances, as well as museums, memorials, and street actions. We will ask what role the arts play in combatting the erasure of past violence from current memory and in creating new political visions and new histories for future generations. And we will look particularly at the role of gender and social difference on the workings of power and resistance. At the same time, we will probe the limits of comparative, multi-directional and connective approaches to memory politics and political action.

sp11_theories_spectatorship

This course explores the many ways in which theorists and theatre practitioners have thought about the ways in which staged action (whether in film, theatre, or politics) pacifies, activates, interpolates, and manipulates viewers. We will explore concepts such as identification, voyeurism, narcissism, bearing witness, percepticide, spect-actor, and others.

sp2012_memory

This course explores the interconnections between trauma, memory, and performance in the Americas by looking at the dark sites and traces left by criminal politics. Instead of starting with the events themselves—the detentions, torture, and disappearances—we look at the spaces in which they have taken place and the paradigms for thinking about criminal politics and remembrance.

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This course explores the many ways in which artists and activists use art (performance, mural paintings, graffiti, writing, music) to make a social intervention in the Americas. We begin the course by examining several theories about art and activism (Brecht, Boal, Buenaventura, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Foucault among others) and then focus on issues of agency, space, event, and spectatorship in relation to major political movements (revolution, dictatorship, democracy, globalization, and human rights) as seen in the work of major practitioners. Jesusa Rodríguez will lead an intensive one-week performance workshop as part of the course. Performances, video screenings, guest lectures, and visits to FOMMA, Chiapas Media Project, a Zapatista community and other activist projects will provide an additional dimension to the questions raised by the theoretical readings and discussions. Students are encouraged to develop their own sites of investigation and present their work as a final presentation and paper.

sp11_theories_spectatorship

This course explores the many ways in which theorists and theatre practitioners have thought about the ways in which staged action (whether in film, theatre, or politics) pacifies, activates, interpolates, and manipulates viewers. We will explore concepts such as identification, voyeurism, narcissism, bearing witness, percepticide, spect-actor, and others.