Lupe & JuanDi From The Block (2003)

Lupe & JuanDi From The Block (2003) Fulana

Fulana's "Lupe & JuanDi from the Block" is a mock music video that explores two main themes: the hyper-commercialization of religious icons, and the "whitening" of Latinos when they cross over into mainstream pop culture. Fulana used The Virgin of Guadalupe to comment on the commodification of religion, as her image is everywhere: on t-shirts, postcards, key chains, handbags, designer jeans, etc.; she has become a hipster-friendly Latina Virgin superstar. Juan Diego, the indigenous man to whom this Virgin first appeared, has recently made it to sainthood, but he has been "whitened" in the Vatican's official image, which erases his indigenous traits and makes him look like a Spaniard. This is reminiscent of the whitening of Latina/o pop stars when they "make it" in the music industry (e.g. Shakira). Rewriting J-Lo's pop hit "Jenny from the Block," this video stages the "creation" of Saint Juan Diego by mafia-sounding Vatican intelligence (the Pope and music producer Emilio Estefan). Knowing the Catholic Church is in crisis, losing many of their flock to Evangelicals, they decide to canonize Juan Diego to attract the Latino market. Mr. Estefan gives Juan Diego a "cross-over make-over" and the Pope canonizes him on the spot. JuanDi is thrilled by his transformation, but the Virgin admonishes him for having sold out. As the song progresses, their fighting becomes more intense, their egos take over, and they eventually alienate their supporters, who go off with an Evangelical couple who knocks at their door.

 


Script

icon Lupe and JuanDi From The Block (eng) (60.39 kB)

Save

Save

Media

Additional Info

  • Title: Lupe & JuanDi From The Block
  • Holdings: photo gallery, script, video (HIDVL)
  • Duration: 00:05:06
  • Language: Spanish
  • Date: 2003
  • Location: New York City.
  • Type-Format: performance, film, multimedia, satire, video art
  • Cast: Lisandra Ramos-Grullón ; Luis Grullón-Ramos ; Andrea Thome ; Marlène Ramírez-Cancio ; Herminia Collado ; Aroosha Rana ; Miguel Luciano ; Adriana Vázquez.
  • Credits: Fulana (Cristina Ibarra, Marlène Ramírez-Cancio, Lisandra Ramos-Grullón & Andrea Thome), creator, producer, director ; Cristina Ibarra, director, editor ; Jessica Yllarramendi, assistant director ; Esteban Lima, director of photography ; Milton Ruiz, sound recording & mixing ; Franklin Molina, costumes ; Sandra Saavedra, makeup ; Herminia Collado, choreography ; Andrea Thome, choreography ; Miguel Luciano, art ; Marlène Ramírez-Cancio, graphic design.