Video documentation of Teatro Esquina Latinas Cuentos eróticos africanos-del Decamerón Negro presented as part of the 3rd Encuentro of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, celebrated in July of 2002 in Lima, Peru under the title Globalization, Migration and the Public Sphere. Cuentos eróticos africanos is based on The Black Decameron, a compilation of African folk stories by anthropologist Leo Frobenius. This is a shortened piece of the original production of Teatro Esquina Latina, with two actresses instead of the original four. The play is a spectacle of storytelling that creates the scene, for young people and adults, of the daily life, humor, and the game of love in the land that is Africa.

Teatro Esquina Latina is a cooperative theatre group from Cali, Colombia, founded in 1973 in the Universidad del Valle as a student group and directed by Orlando Cajamarca Castro.

Teatro Esquina Latina: Cuentos eróticos africanos-del Decamerón Negro

Video documentation of Tito Vasconcelos' solo performance presented during the 2nd Encuentro of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, celebrated in June of 2001 in Monterrey, Mexico under the title 'Memory, Atrocity and Resistance'. A parody of Mexican politics and a queering of the Mexican political landscape, in this performance, Vasconcelos is in 'drag' as Martita, President Vicente Fox's then partner, on her way to become First Lady of Mexico.

Tito Vasconcelos: Martita, Primera Dama and others

Video documentation of Jim Calder and Sigfrido Aguilars performance The Alamo Piece presented as part of the 2nd Encuentro of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, celebrated in June of 2001 in Monterrey, Mexico under the title Memory, Atrocity and Resistance.

Jim Calder & Sigfrido Aguilar: The Alamo Piece

Video documentation of Gigi Otálvaro-Hormillosa's performance 'Cosmic Blood,' presented as part of the 3rd Encuentro of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, celebrated in July of 2002 in Lima, Peru under the title Globalization, Migration and the Public Sphere. 'Cosmic Blood' explores the concept of mestizaje, a Spanish word used to describe the race mixture of Spanish and indigenous blood as a result of colonialism, from a perspective informed by history, contemporary culture and racial formation and creative, spiritual speculation about the future. The performance aims to illustrate the contradictory aspects of mestizaje in which the genocide and rape of one race led to the creation of a new race. Furthermore, it looks to redefine mestizaje to incorporate mixed race and queer identities, portraying subversive yet fluid identities to dismantle the binaries created by colonial constructs relating to race and gender.Theories of contact between ancient civilizations and extraterrestrials influenced the performance artist's vision of a cosmic mestizaje in which the impending transformation of the world as we know it may lead to possibilities for the creation of a new existence and way of being.

Gigi Otálvaro-Hormillosa, also known as the Devil Bunny in Bondage, is a San Francisco based interdisciplinary performance artist, video artist, cultural activist, curator and percussionist of Filipino and Colombian descent. She is originally from Miami, Florida and received her B.A. from Brown University where she created an independent concentration entitled 'Hybridity and Performance.' She is currently the Artistic Director of (a)eromestiza, an interdisciplinary arts organization dedicated to presenting experimental video and performance work by queer and/or people of color.She has also worked with non-profit organizations such as Proyecto ContraSIDA Por Vida, New Langton Arts, Galería de la Raza, the Queer Cultural Center, Asian American Theater Company and the Asian Pacific Islander Cultural Center. She has worked on various artistic collaborations under the mentorship and direction of performing artists such as Pearl Ubungen, Guillermo Gómez-Peña, Elia Arce and Afia Walking Tree. Her work in performance, video and writing has been presented nationally and internationally. She has received grants from the Franklin Furnace Fund for Performance Art, the San Francisco Art Commission Cultural Equity Grants Program, the Potrero Nuevo Fund Prize and the Zellerbach Family Fund.

Gigi Otálvaro-Hormillosa: Cosmic Blood

This is a video documentation of the writing of the poem 'La Vida Nueva' in New York City's sky. For this 'performance-acción' or ‘poesía-acción’ (‘poetry-action’), five planes drew white smoke letters silhouetted over the blue sky. The poem was written in Spanish as form of recognition for all the minority groups all over the world.

Raúl Zurita: La vida nueva

In 'Zona de dolor' (Zone of Pain), Eltit places the body – her body – at the center of this political and social re-signification: she cuts and burns herself and then goes to a brothel, where she reads part of her novel 'Lumpérica.' Her mortified body mirrors the wounded national body, and establishes a connection between the individual and the collective, and the private and the public, exposing her physicality, her words, and her voice in communion with a space that exists at the edge of social structures.

Diamela Eltit: Zona de dolor

This category is a temporary repository for holdings by artists and scholars who have contributed work to the HIDVL Digital Library but do not yet have a full profile.

The Anti-Empire, Anti-War Cabaret, part of the Hemispheric Institute's 2003 Spectacles of Religiosities Encuentro was envisioned as a unified hemispheric scream, bringing together activists, artists and academics against the Bush Administration's war plans and empire building.

Anti-War, Anti-Empire Cabaret

Mélange of music and dance by contemporary Native American and African American performers, presented at the Francisco Nunes theater in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, as a part of the 5th Encuentro of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, titled Performing Heritage: Contemporary Indigenous and Community-Based Practices (http://hemisphericinstitute.org/eng/seminar/brazil2005/index.html). This performance brings together four contemporary American performances drawing from the artists' cultural roots: Quetzal Guerrero (Native American violinist and dancer), Larry Yazzie (Meskwaki/ Dine World Champion Fancy Dancer), David Pleasant (African-American Gullah/Geeche percussion and song, performing with dancer Joyah Pugh), and Dancing Earth (Indigenous Modern Dance collective directed by Rulan Tangen, with the participation of Quetzal Guerrero, Anthony Thosh Collins and Alejandro Meraz). Quetzal Guerrero and Thosh Collins open the evening with a traditional chant from the Salt River Pima-Maricopa indian community, followed by Quetzal's original solo violin piece. Larry Yazzie then performs his dazzling powwow Fancy Dance from Tama, Iowa, followed by the energetic and powerful percussion of African American David Pleasant, who draws on rhythms dating back to slavery in the United States. Dancing Earth performs a dance piece about the creation of the earth, and the evening ends with all performers bringing together their traditions--and the audience--on stage. There is also a post-performance discussion with the artists, in which they talk about the origins and meanings of their performances.

Mélange of contemporary American performance (2005)

In this interview, conducted by Andrew McLean at the Hemispheric Institute 5th Encuentro (Belo Horizonte, 2005), Pamyua's four founding members (Stephen Blanchett, Phillip Blanchett, Ossie…

Interview with Pamyua (2005)

Mélange of music and dance by contemporary Native American and African American performers, presented at the Francisco Nunes theater in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, as a part of the 5th Encuentro of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, titled Performing Heritage: Contemporary Indigenous and Community-Based Practices. This performance brings together four contemporary American performances drawing from the artists' cultural roots: Quetzal Guerrero (Native American violinist and dancer), Larry Yazzie (Meskwaki/ Dine World Champion Fancy Dancer), David Pleasant (African-American Gullah/Geeche percussion and song, performing with dancer Joyah Pugh), and Dancing Earth (Indigenous Modern Dance collective directed by Rulan Tangen, with the participation of Quetzal Guerrero, Anthony Thosh Collins and Alejandro Meraz). Quetzal Guerrero and Thosh Collins open the evening with a traditional chant from the Salt River Pima-Maricopa indian community, followed by Quetzal's original solo violin piece. Larry Yazzie then performs his dazzling powwow Fancy Dance from Tama, Iowa, followed by the energetic and powerful percussion of African American David Pleasant, who draws on rhythms dating back to slavery in the United States. Dancing Earth performs a dance piece about the creation of the earth, and the evening ends with all performers bringing together their traditions--and the audience--on stage. There is also a post-performance discussion with the artists, in which they talk about the origins and meanings of their performances.

Mélange of contemporary American performance (2005)

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