The Collections
Tuesday, 24 August 2010 11:10

Aquilo de que somos feitos (2000)

Aquilo de que somos feitos was created over a period of two years of research and rehearsals, in 1999 and 2000, when the celebrations for the 500 years of Brazil's "discovery" where very present. One of the starting points was, therefore, to "discover" and to deal with issues such as citizenship, history, memory. How can art think the world, and how can these ways of knowing serve the world? In this performance the audience shares the same space with the dancers, in proximity and exposed to a dilated time, where movement happens extremely slowly, stimulating a different way of seeing that is almost "epidermic." The object of investigation is the body, the flesh, both aesthetically—what unexpected shapes can it produce, what different ways can it occupy space—and philosophically, how much is a body worth, it's labor, it's meanings? In this work the audience is co-author, assigning whatever meaning it wishes to the shapes the body makes and to the political and advertisement slogans the dancers say.

Published in Lia Rodrigues: Works
Thursday, 05 August 2010 15:53

Zé Celso Amnesty Session (2010)

In 1974, José Celso Martinez Corrêa was arrested by the military dictatorship and taken to the DOPS—the Department for Political and Social Order—where he was brutally tortured and put into prison. Thirty years later, the theater director filed a requirement for official pardon and compensation with the Amnesty Commission. This commission had been created by law 10.559 of 2002, an addition to the infamous law 6.683 of 1979, which granted general amnesty to all who committed political crimes under the dictatorship, both in the military and in the resistance.

In 2010, the Amnesty Commission held it's 35th public session at Teatro Oficina, to read and vote on Zé Celso's requirement. The official theatricality of the law was combined with O Banquete, a play by the group, and the audience was received by a Serbian-Croatian song, followed by the washing of their feet by the cast in character. The rapporteur for the case was attorney and actor Prudente José Silveira Mello, who read the report in a suit and barefoot, on the set of the play.

 


Related Materials:

"The end of all tortures in Brazil," open letter by Zé Celso (POR)
"Political amnesty for Zé Celso," blog post announcing the event (POR)
"Amnesty for Zé Celso," article in the Estado de São Paulo 04/07/2010 (POR)
"How the Amnesty Session for Zé Celso went," blog post (POR)


Zé Celso's speech in the Amnesty Session 1/4, youtube video (POR)
Zé Celso's speech in the Amnesty Session 2/4, youtube video (POR)
Zé Celso's speech in the Amnesty Session 3/4, youtube video (POR)
Zé Celso's speech in the Amnesty Session 4/4, youtube video (POR)
Amnesty Commission Council votes, youtube video (POR)

Tuesday, 13 July 2010 17:11

Encarnado (2005)

In 2003, Lia Rodrigues Companhia de Danças was invited by CEASM, the Centre for Study and Social Action at the Favela da Maré, for a residency at the Maré Culture House. Favela da Maré is one of the largest complexes of favelas in Rio de Janeiro, with a population of over 130,000. The initial material for this production was a series of questions: Is it possible to identify with those who suffer? How are we affected by our own pains? What are the things that really count in our lives? How can we break borders and recreate a common territory? How can dance interfere, or even exist, in the context of a reality as tragic as Brazil's? encarnado was created in the space of the favela keeping an open door policy, so that members of the community could watch rehearsals, and the dancers could interact with the community. The assumption was that the body, in contact with a new space, produces a new way of moving, of thinking, of generating new forms of organization.

Published in Lia Rodrigues: Works

From 2000 to 2007, Teat(r)o Oficina Uzyna Uzona worked on the staging of Euclides da Cunha's epic book, Os Sertões, which describes the 19th Century War of Canudos in the Brazilian "sertão," lead by Antônio Conselheiro. The final result was a pentalogy, formed by the plays A Terra (2002), O Homem I (2003), O Homem II (2003), A Luta I (2005), and A Luta II (2006), totalizing 27 hours of theater. Os Sertões reads the episodes of the war in light of past and present Brazilian history, and in relation to the struggle of the group against media mogul Sílvio Santos, who wanted to tear down the historic theater to build a shopping mall.

Dedicated to "all the power of the Un-massacre of Art and to the effects of the Trans-Human power of the Crowd," the staging of the last part of the book deals with the fourth and last expedition by the Brazilian National Army to the Northeastern "sertão." 12 thousand soldiers, cannons, and modern weapons where deployed, together with modern strategists such as Marshal Bittencourt who, for the first time in the history of the Brazilian Army, established an operational base away from the front, from where he commanded the maneuvers that General Arthur Oscar and his deputy, the blood-thirsty General Barbosa, executed. The play shows the end of the War of Canudos, which resulted in the massacre of the sertanejos, the death of Antônio Conselheiro himself (who went to meet God), and the destruction of the citadel. In Teatro Oficina, the massacre is performed not as a mass for the repetition of the martyrdom, but from the perspective of an un-massacre. By exposing this closed abscess of Brazilian History in the Public Square of Theater, it wishes to lance it once and for all, to purge it from the everyday practice of Brazilian life. Canudos did not surrender, and Euclides da Cunha ends his book by reminding us that it is not one of defense, but of attack.


Additional Materials

iconOs Sertões: A Luta II, program with script (POR) (1.38 MB)

Published in Teatro Oficina: Works
Tuesday, 13 July 2010 14:32

Os Sertões: A luta 1 (2005)

From 2000 to 2007, Teat(r)o Oficina Uzyna Uzona worked on the staging of Euclides da Cunha's epic book, Os Sertões, which describes the 19th Century War of Canudos in the Brazilian "sertão," lead by Antônio Conselheiro. The final result was a pentalogy, formed by the plays A Terra (2002), O Homem I (2003), O Homem II (2003), A Luta I (2005), and A Luta II (2006), totalizing 27 hours of theater. Os Sertões reads the episodes of the war in light of past and present Brazilian history, and in relation to the struggle of the group against media mogul Sílvio Santos, who wanted to tear down the historic theater to build a shopping mall.

Dedicated to "the poet Oswald de Andrade and to the businessman, showman, and actor Sílvio Santos," the third part of the book tells the causing incident of the war, when a judge from Juazeiro stopped a shipment of wood that was paid for from being delivered for the construction of the New Church of Canudos. Three expeditions were sent by the National Army and defeated, the last one commanded by the famous Colonel Moreira César. The Army faced the humiliation of soldiers deserting and running away, and the impaling of Colonel Tamarindo. He ended up being the main character in a macabre installation on the road to Canudos, created by the Jagunços (thugs from the sertão) and the Mandrakes to intimidate new expeditions. The first movement of A Luta is written in cordel verse (popular string literature form). A Luta I also amplifies the performance space, with trench houses from the invincible Canudos that effectively form a spinal cord in the runway, and the aerial spaces of the mutãs, hideouts used by the Indians in the top branches of trees to hunt the jaguar, which the followers of Antônio Conselheiro reinvented. Lirinha, a musician from the Pernambuco band Cordel do Fogo Encantado, brought his passion for soundtracks, recording sounds from the theater itself, and transforming them into shots, artillery, creating with music the vanguard of the fight. The physical space of the performance is extended to the world, with recorded images, sampled, embroidered, in the streets that surround the theater, in the dressing rooms, in places hidden from the direct sight of the audience, making live cinema.


Additional Materials

iconOs Sertões: A Luta I, program with script (POR) (7.21 MB)

Published in Teatro Oficina: Works

From 2000 to 2007, Teat(r)o Oficina Uzyna Uzona worked on the staging of Euclides da Cunha's epic book, Os Sertões, which describes the 19th Century War of Canudos in the Brazilian "sertão," lead by Antônio Conselheiro. The final result was a pentalogy, formed by the plays A Terra (2002), O Homem I (2003), O Homem II (2003), A Luta I (2005), and A Luta II (2006), totalizing 27 hours of theater. Os Sertões reads the episodes of the war in light of past and present Brazilian history, and in relation to the struggle of the group against media mogul Sílvio Santos, who wanted to tear down the historic theater to build a shopping mall.


Dedicated to "the creation of an heroic and anti-heroic attitude of those that go to war and say: Farewell Man!," the theatrical version of the second movement of the second part of Os Sertões presents the passage from the re-volted man to the trans-man, creator of an alternate possibility for human adventure on Earth. From the story of Antônio Conselheiro, all theater relives its seminal death: a common man who, out of love, transmutes into an anti-messianic leader, gathering a legion of "sertanejos," roots of solidarity in the inlands of Bahia who, in a community effort, raise dams, churchs, and cemiteries. The community had at one point 25 thousand inhabitants, in its days the second largest city of Bahia. Capuchin Friars attempted to disperse the people of Canudos "diplomatically." Their denial to obey the official religious order led the Evangelist Friar to damn the followers of Antônio Conselheiro in the name of Jesus. The City prepares for war.


Additional Materials

iconOs Sertões: O Homem II, program with script (POR) (6.4 MB)

iconOs Sertões: O Homem II, program with script (POR) (2.97 MB)

Published in Teatro Oficina: Works

From 2000 to 2007, Teat(r)o Oficina Uzyna Uzona worked on the staging of Euclides da Cunha's epic book, Os Sertões, which describes the 19th Century War of Canudos in the Brazilian "sertão," lead by Antônio Conselheiro. The final result was a pentalogy, formed by the plays A Terra (2002), O Homem I (2003), O Homem II (2003), A Luta I (2005), and A Luta II (2006), totalizing 27 hours of theater. Os Sertões reads the episodes of the war in light of past and present Brazilian history, and in relation to the struggle of the group against media mogul Sílvio Santos, who wanted to tear down the historic theater to build a shopping mall.

To understand the soul of the "sertanejo" (the inhabitant of the sertão)—what would lead the nature of this man to resist until the last day in Canudos—Euclides da Cunha recalls in his book the formation of Brazilian society, its telluric, animal, and tupi origin. The second part of the book (and the second play, O Homem I), is about the vigorous embrace of the winner, the Celtic European Colonizer, copulating with the defeated, with the slaves from the ships, forming the "Typeless-Brazilian" type. Mixtures of all kinds find their space in the stage in the surprising miscegenation already present in the cast and crew of Teatro Oficina itself. It is the story of the Brazilian Man, the Man of the Country abroad interbreeding with the Country inside, until the Revolt against the very idea—imposed and imported—of man, with the appearance of Zarathustra Antônio Conselheiro.


Additional Materials

iconOs Sertões: O Homem I, program with script (POR) (4.07 MB)

iconOs Sertões: O Homem I, program with script (POR) (2.11 MB)

Published in Teatro Oficina: Works
Tuesday, 13 July 2010 14:22

Os Sertões: A Terra (2002)

From 2000 to 2007, Teat(r)o Oficina Uzyna Uzona worked on the staging of Euclides da Cunha's epic book, Os Sertões, which describes the 19th Century War of Canudos in the Brazilian "sertão," lead by Antônio Conselheiro. The final result was a pentalogy, formed by the plays A Terra (2002), O Homem I (2003), O Homem II (2003), A Luta I (2005), and A Luta II (2006), totalizing 27 hours of theater. Os Sertões reads the episodes of the war in light of past and present Brazilian history, and in relation to the struggle of the group against media mogul Sílvio Santos, who wanted to tear down the historic theater to build a shopping mall.

In A Terra, the first impact is the geography of the sertão. Euclides da Cunha describes each part of the sertão in the first part of his book, revealing to the reader an x-ray of the region. In the play, a carnival opera, an epic Brazilian musical, the actors are the earth, the vegetation, the wind, the animals, the rivers, the drought. It reveals the most intimate secrets of nature, that also vibrate in the human and trans-human arteries. When this work returned as a musical overture to the whole pentalogy, enriched by the experience that the subsequent works brought to the creators and to the audience, it gained an updated insight into the human interference in the environment. Destructive power is proportional to financial power, and the discussion about the way space gets occupied was brought to the forefront, including the real-estate boom that surrounds today not only Teatro Oficina, but the whole world, now hotter and more arid.


Additional Materials

iconOs Sertões: A Terra, program with script (POR) (3.57 MB)

Published in Teatro Oficina: Works