The Collections
Tuesday, 16 November 2010 09:16

Acceso controlado (1995)

Acceso controlado is a multimedia spectacle revolving around the theme of controlled access and the metaphor (and growing reality) of gated communities in Puerto Rico. Five sections comprise this piece, with five characters masterfully performed by Hernández. La Reina delivers a fascist, classist, racist speech, claiming that democratization and mestizaje are crimes against the historic order. The security guard Teniente Cortés talks about the paranoia and false security nets people resort to - controlling access through the now ubiquitous gated communities being one of them - in order to protect themselves form the alarming growth of criminality in Puerto Rico. We later find El Chamaco in Primera Plana, a scene exploring the body language and expressions of the criminal(ized) youth, bringing to the forefront the interplay between will and subjection, the criminal life on the street and the institutional forces trying to control it. A short film follows, titled Milagros Vélez, based on Request Concert by Franz Xaver Kroetz and Act without Words by Samuel Beckett. The last piece, La Primera Dama en Solo Operático en Tiempos Desafortunados completes the performance, with a hysterical First Lady symbolizing the banality of complaint in a society where a financial elite controls cultural expression and politicians hide corruption behind hypocritical civic concern.

Published in Javier Cardona: Works
Friday, 16 July 2010 10:36

Interview with Dancing Earth (2005)

Dancing Earth is an array of indigenous dance artists who work as a collective under the leadership of Rulan Tangen, striving to embody a unique essence of Indigenous identity and perspective by creation and renewal of artistic and cultural movement rituals.

This video documents an evening of music and dance by contemporary Native American and African American performers, presented at the Francisco Nunes theater in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, as a part of the 5th Encuentro of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, titled Performing Heritage: Contemporary Indigenous and Community-Based Practices. This performance brings together four contemporary American performances drawing from the artists' cultural roots: Quetzal Guerrero (Native American violinist and dancer), Larry Yazzie (Meskwaki/ Dine World Champion Fancy Dancer), David Pleasant (African-American Gullah/Geeche percussion and song, performing with dancer Joyah Pugh), and Dancing Earth (Indigenous Modern Dance collective directed by Rulan Tangen, with the participation of Quetzal Guerrero, Anthony Thosh Collins and Alejandro Meraz). Quetzal Guerrero and Thosh Collins open the evening with a traditional chant from the Salt River Pima-Maricopa indian community, followed by Quetzal's original solo violin piece. Larry Yazzie then performs his dazzling powwow Fancy Dance from Tama, Iowa, followed by the energetic and powerful percussion of African American David Pleasant, who draws on rhythms dating back to slavery in the United States. Dancing Earth performs a dance piece about the creation of the earth, and the evening ends with all performers bringing together their traditions--and the audience--on stage. There is also a post-performance discussion with the artists, in which they talk about the origins and meanings of their performances.

Dancing Earth performance begins at the 00:30:20 mark.

Published in Dancing Earth: Works

Mélange of music and dance by contemporary Native American and African American performers, presented at the Francisco Nunes theater in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, as a part of the 5th Encuentro of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, titled Performing Heritage: Contemporary Indigenous and Community-Based Practices. This performance brings together four contemporary American performances drawing from the artists' cultural roots: Quetzal Guerrero (Native American violinist and dancer), Larry Yazzie (Meskwaki/ Dine World Champion Fancy Dancer), David Pleasant (African-American Gullah/Geeche percussion and song, performing with dancer Joyah Pugh), and Dancing Earth (Indigenous Modern Dance collective directed by Rulan Tangen, with the participation of Quetzal Guerrero, Anthony Thosh Collins and Alejandro Meraz). Quetzal Guerrero and Thosh Collins open the evening with a traditional chant from the Salt River Pima-Maricopa indian community, followed by Quetzal's original solo violin piece. Larry Yazzie then performs his dazzling powwow Fancy Dance from Tama, Iowa, followed by the energetic and powerful percussion of African American David Pleasant, who draws on rhythms dating back to slavery in the United States. Dancing Earth performs a dance piece about the creation of the earth, and the evening ends with all performers bringing together their traditions--and the audience--on stage. There is also a post-performance discussion with the artists, in which they talk about the origins and meanings of their performances.