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I Want A Better Catastrophe Andrew Boyd’s Gallows Humor

April 09, 2018 6:00 pm

Bumming out about climate apocalypse? The 6th Great Extinction getting you down? Join Andrew Boyd for a “hopelessness workshop.” Thrown into a crisis of hope, this life-long activist set off on a quest to find out how leading thinkers and your grandmother are grappling with the “impossible news” of our climate doom. He’s returned with an unfinished manuscript and a broadside of gallows-humor life-advice — as well as a few surprisingly emotional flowcharts — about how to live on the cusp of catastrophe, including: ”The apocalypse is a terrible thing to waste,” ”Hopelessness can save the world,” and “Don’t worry, we’re not heading off a cliff, just a sharp slippery slope.” Together, we’ll step through the 5 stages of climate grief, gamely game-out our existential options, and ask aloud several taboo questions, including: “Why the fuck am I recycling?” If you’ve ever wanted to tell someone else how to write their own book, now’s your chance. You’ll laugh, you’ll cry, you’ll tell him which subtitle he should use. Maybe another end of the world is possible?

We invite you to attend the reading of Andrew Boyd’s manuscript and share your feedback. This event is co-sponsored by NYU's Department of Art and Public Policy.

Hemispheric Institute
20 Cooper Square, fifth floor
New York, NY 10003

Andrew Boyd is an author, humorist and long-time veteran of creative campaigns for social change. He led the decade-long satirical media campaign “Billionaires for Bush,” founded the art-activist toolbox and laboratory Beautiful Trouble, and co-created the grief-storytelling ritual The Climate Ribbon. He's the author of several books, including Daily Afflictions and Life’s Little Deconstruction Book. In his current work-in-progress, I Want a Better Catastrophe, he explores the emotional and ethical dimensions of our climate predicament. Unable to come up with his own lifelong ambition, he’s been cribbing from Milan Kundera: “to unite the utmost seriousness of question with the utmost lightness of form.”

The event is free and open to the public. A reception will follow. A photo ID is required to enter NYU buildings and 20 Cooper Square is a wheelchair accessible venue.